WIESERGUT'S TRANSFORMATION

TO THE MANOR
REBORN

“The neighbors thought we were a little crazy, but they know we’ve always gone our own way.”
JOSEF KRÖLL
31 – Jan – 2013

In German, “gut” means “good”. But it also means “country manor”, which is where the Wiesergut got part of its name. The original manor house dates to the year 1350 and it, and the surrounding plot, was in Sepp Kröll’s family even then. “The land here has a long, long history,” he says, explaining that he and and his wife Martina attempted to use parts of the old structure for the newly-built hotel. Unfortunately the old stone foundations were too unstable to build upon and the couple cleared the ground to start fresh, constructing a new taller “manor” building for the “Gutshof” suites; they also erected a rectangular arrangement of buildings for the garden suites, restaurant, reception, bar, lounge, and spa, all enclosing a private courtyard.

The lines and layout are so clear and harmonious they would make a feng-shui master proud. But elements of old-school Austria are everywhere: There are oak floors and ornately carved wooden wall panels in the private dining room. Cabinet doors in the suites are covered with vintage linen sourced from Austrian farmers in a unique shade of light blue. And the huge baskets in the spa are hand-woven by an elderly mountain man from nearby Kitzbühel.

The details add up to an intriguing reinterpretation of tradition, and reinvigorate the notion of what this land, this house, this “gut” is about. “The neighbors thought we were a little crazy,” says Sepp, describing how the surrounding hotel operators watched the new buildings go up, “but they know we’ve always gone our own way.” Back in the old days, a “gut” or manor represented stability, tradition, wealth of resources, and generosity. Essentially, nothing has really changed here at all.

Author

KIMBERLY BRADLEY

Tags

WIESERGUT | SEPP & MARTINA KROELL

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A SUITE CHALLENGEposted 28.01.2013